South Florida Corruption

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CURRENT NEWS>>>>>JQC Dismisses Ethics Charges Against John Contini-On Friday August 03, 2018, The Florida JQC (Judicial Qualifications Commission), dismissed the charges they filed only eleven days prior against the former judge.-------Former Broward Judge John Contini Proposes A Voluntary Five Year Suspension Amid A Florida Bar Investigation Into His Conduct As A Judge In Broward County------- 1.4 million people in Florida are permanently excluded from voting because of a prior felony conviction. Florida is one of only four states with a lifetime ban on voting------- Now is the time to return the eligibility to vote to Floridians who have done their time and paid their debts------Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Avoids Meeting with Broward Judges->>>>>>>Why did the chief judge cancel?- “An implied warning for judicial “leakers” to a blog that only wants to make them look bad, and a confirmation that the Chief Justice cancelled his trip to avoid a circus after the announcement appeared on the blog.”>>>>> Chief Administrative Judge Jack Tuter said Saturday that he is telling Circuit Court Judge Merrilee Ehrlich not to return to the courthouse because of how she treated Sandra Twiggs.>>>>>Howard Finkelstein: Judge Lazarus Should Be Removed From Hearing All Future Criminal Matters-This is an update of a story we did last week about Broward County Judge Joel T. Lazarus, and the statements he made while presiding over First Appearance/Bond Court, on Friday, January 19th. Apparently it got the attention of the Broward County Public Defender, Howard Finkelstein.------Broward County judge Joel Lazarus, was caught on a “Hot Mic” fifteen minutes before he presided over Friday’s morning session of magistrate, or first appearance/bond court, stating to prosecutors: “I double the bonds, for those that take place in my neighborhood”.------>>>>

Florida Recording Law

The Following is republished courtesy of the Digital Media Law Project (DMLP)

Information in this guide is based on general principles of law and is intended for information purposes only; we make no claim as to the comprehensiveness or accuracy of the information. It is not offered for the purpose of providing individualized legal advice. Use of this guide does not create an attorney-client or any other relationship between the user and southfloridacorruption.com.

DISCLAIMER

Florida Recording Law

 

 

Note: This page covers information specific to Florida. For general information concerning the use of recording devices see the Recording Phone Calls, Conversations, Meetings and Hearings section of this
guide.

 

 

Florida Wiretapping Law

 

 

Florida's wiretapping law is a "two-party consent" law. Florida makes it a crime to intercept or record a "wire, oral, or electronic communication" in Florida, unless all parties to the communication consent. See Fla. Stat. ch. 934.03.

 

Florida law makes an exception for in-person communications when the parties do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the conversation, such as when they are engaged in conversation in a public place where they might reasonably be overheard. If you are operating in Florida, you may record these kinds of in-person conversations without breaking the law. However, you should always get the consent of all parties before recording any telephone conversation and any in person that common sense tells you is private.

 

In addition to subjecting you to criminal prosecution, violating the Florida wiretapping law can expose you to a civil lawsuit for damages by an injured party.

 

Consult The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press's Can We Tape?: Florida for more information on Florida wiretapping law.

 

 

 

Florida Law on Recording Court Hearings and Public Meetings

 

 

 

Court Hearings

 

Florida state courts generally allow the use of recording devices in the courtroom, both at the trial and appellate level. The presiding judge may prohibit recording devices from the courtroom only upon a showing that the presence of such devices will adversely affect the fairness or integrity of the proceedings.

 

Federal courts in Florida generally prohibit the use of recording devices and cameras in the courtroom, both at the trial and the appellate level.

 

For information on your right of access to court proceedings, please consult the Access to Government Information section of the guide.

 

 

Public Meetings

 

If you attend a public meeting (i.e., a meeting of a governmental body required to be open to the public by law) in Florida, generally you are permitted to use sound or video recording devices, so long as your
recording does not disrupt the meeting.

 

For information on your right of access to public meetings, please consult the Access to Government Information section of this guide and The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press's Open Government Guide: Florida.

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